Author Topic: How to maintain the male to female direction of airflow for  (Read 4899 times)

rickharp

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How to maintain the male to female direction of airflow for
« on: November 02, 2011, 03:09:44 PM »
Question sent in via email from Stuart

I am under the impression, from my knowledge and training that all dryer vent ducts should have the male side of the duct going away from the dryer, as not to catch lint blowing through the conduit.  Whether it is the DryerFlex or any other kind of transition I can't find any way around having the transition duct (at the wall end) be the female. Any ideas about this?  Thanks.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »
Rick Harpenau
In-O-Vate Technologies, Inc
Jupiter, FL  33477
561-743-8696

rickharp

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Re: How to maintain the male to female direction of airflow
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2011, 03:10:43 PM »
Thanks Stuart and good question; one we field ever so often.  

You are right, the building code is very clear as it states: “The insert end of the duct shall extend into the adjoining duct or fitting in the direction of airflow.” (504.6.2)

In this case, the code is clearly addressing the “duct installation” or the concealed duct.  The dryer “transition hose” or flex is not in the concealed space so code wise this would not come into play.  I agree with you that if there was a way to secure the transition hose to the wall outlet pipe and maintain that male to female direction of airflow that this would create additional protection from lint catching on that pipe fitting.  

In my 20 years in the industry I’ve never come across an inspector or situation where the job was turned down because of this.  Perhaps 98% of transition hose installations are accomplished with flexible duct (the latter being hard pipe).  For transition hose to be “flexible” it needs to be soft or pliable, and thus eliminates any chance of being able to “clamp down” on the flex pipe to secure it as it would just collapse.  

Bottom line: although the method is not 100% correct, it remains the acceptable (best or only) way to attach the flex to the wall outlet.  Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »
Rick Harpenau
In-O-Vate Technologies, Inc
Jupiter, FL  33477
561-743-8696