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Author Topic: How to vent dryer several different answers don't know who to trust  (Read 5583 times)

92COMETS

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Hello,  I am new to this forum, hope someone has answers I can trust and use.

Issue.  Have a dryer that is on interior wall.  The original vent went into attic up inside the 2x4 wall but it didn't go through the roof.
Then the home owner vented it into the garage - the back of the interior wall is the garage.  This has caused damage due to moisture in the garage with paint peeling, some mildew etc.

Question for me is what would be the most appropriate and safest way to properly vent this dryer.

1. Roofer wanted to run a new pipe on the inside of the wall 6" rigid pipe straight up through ceiling, attic, roof.

2. Home handy man wanted to take the pipe straight through the interior wall from the laundry room into the garage, then 90 it and run it straight out of the garage.  Less than 25 feet total.  I would have to make a box to elevate the water filter system, as well as elevate the water heater 18" off the ground.  (I have a new water heater-gas but some say it does not need to be elevated 18" others say yes you do need to elevate it.  It is in it's own closet)

3. An AC and Heating guy wants to put a 4" rigid pipe up the interior wall into the attic and then 90 elbow it and run it straight out the side of the house.  This length might be 25-30 feet with 2 90 elbows.

Okay so I have gotten several different answers and have been trying to educate myself with the internet and have more questions than answers.

A. I read article that said never vent the dryer from an interior living space to exterior such as interior wall to garage. There did not seem to be a reason it just said don't do it.

B. I have read to use all rigid piping with duct tape and may insulate the pipe with insulation to help avoid condensation, etc.  I live in South Texas I don't know if this would help but I was interested in wrapping the pipe with attic roll insulation.  So this was a good idea but I don't know if you should.

C. I am little concerned going vertical up the interior wall because it is 2x4 construction and I don't know if a 4" inch pipe would fit. 

D. If running the pipe on the floor and out the side of the house is the best way to do it, I could either run it into the garage and out through the exterior brick wall that has an opening for gas water heater venting.
Or I could run the pipe on the floor inside the house along the bottom of the interior wall.  Adjacent to the laundry room is a closet that runs the length of the wall to an outside wall.  (This would require me to make a hole in the brick  on the side of the house,  Which would give me more questions or I would just pay someone who know what to do to fix it).

So that is my delima.  Maybe all three suggestions are appropriate and correct in their own right, but since all three people had different ideas, and this dryer venting is a big topic on the internet I was hoping people could advise me of the most appropriate and legal/up to code way of doing this.  If the pipe went along the floor either in the garage, or along the inside closet floor I would want to close it up with a box to protect the pipe, as well as be able to remove the boxes for repairs or cleaning.  If the pipe went through the interior house I would definitely wrap insulation to reduce heat in the house/closet.

Of yes one final question.  Is it beneficial to run most of the piping with 6" versus 4".  I am talking about the 20 feet of piping that would either run along the floor, or across the attic.  I would use the standard 4" to connect to the dryer, and get it to where there was space to increase the size to 6".  If this would not make a difference or be beneficial then I do not want to incur the extra expense and difficulty finding that size pipe.

My Dryer is an electric dryer by the way.

Thank you in advance for your assistance with this very confusing problem.
Tim

rickharp

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The typical way to vent a dryer in a 2x4 wall was to use 3x10 inch rectangular pipe.  if that is what you have, there are good reasons to change this out to round.  Call me if that is the case. 
Bottom line is to vent to the exterior, and the location of the termination is based on this criteria: shortest run, with least amount of elbows and a termination point that is not at a door, window, porch or near an air conditioner.  Wall, soffit and roof terminations are all ok IMHO. 

1. Studies have shown that increasing the size of the pipe does not provide that many benefits.  A down side is the lint is moving slower and may attach easier, also, that most termination hoods are 4" so you have to reduce it anyways at the end, creating restriction again. 

If there were no obstructions in the wall, and you are not doing any drywall removal, i'd push 4? pipe down that wall from the attic into a Model 400 Dryerbox, and penetrate the roof with a DryerJack.  Both of these are my product, and I am not promoting them for that reason.  But they truly are superior in adding efficiency to your project system.  See these links:

http://www.dryerbox.com/photo_gallery/Customers/large/nys-install.jpg  This was a job where we did the above.  A dryer box eliminates the elbow generally found within the wall. 

http://store.dryerbox.com/DryerJack--Low-Profile--Scoop-Design_p_109.html This is the roof vent that has creates no back pressure.  Watch the video. 

3. A. Never heard a comment like this before.
3. B. wrapping or sleeving the pipe with insulation where is penetrates air space that can get very cold will help minimize lint buildup.  The wall might not be worth the trouble, but the attic will.  You may find it easier to sleeve insulated flex duct over the 4" pipe rather than wrapping it. 
3C. Yes there is a slight deformation in the pipe in a 3.5 inch wall, but it is minimal.  If you have the ability to remove all the drywall and fir the wall out to 4.25, then the pipe stays round and you can use the Model 425 Dryerbox (my preference). 
3D. I am totally ok with roof and soffit vents.  and not a fan of all the work with the brick wall. 

4" or 6" comment: Answered above but am not convinced it outweighs all the other issues that using 6" pipe provides.  Stick with 4" duct.  Clean it out every 2 years at a minimum.  Make sure your termination is as efficient as it can be. 

Consider a long turn ell or 45 if you need to dodge an obstacle.  http://store.dryerbox.com/45-Degree-Long-Turn-Ell_p_23.html
You suggest "Duct" tape in your question above.  Make sure you use the silver tape the industry uses, not the old Duct tape we are use to.  Good luck. 

Rick Harpenau
In-O-Vate Technologies, Inc
Jupiter, FL  33477
561-743-8696

92COMETS

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Thank you for the quick response and the advice.

I will look at the dryer box and yes I can remove the drywall from the garage side, and will be able to fir ( will have to look that up but assume make the area large enough for the 4" round pipe ). 

Since these are your products would you recommend the roof part be done by a roofer?  I have built a 2 story storage shed before and roofed it with felt paper and shingles, but I don't know how to remove existing shingles and then lay shingles down to prevent leaking.  My current roof is red shingle. Might have problem finding similar shingle, but I am hoping to have roof redone with metal in couple years, so if I have to get a few shingles that don't match for a year or two no big deal.

I will look at the roof box and watch the video.

rickharp

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There are plenty of how to YouTube video's that demonstrate the proper way to replace or install roof vents. 
Firring out a wall with 1x2's to attain proper depth to keep dryer duct round and to use our 425 Dryerbox will require the whole wall be firred out, other wise there would be a weird step out in the wall, perhaps looking like a after thought alteration.  Just a FYI.  Thanks for asking the question. 
Rick Harpenau
In-O-Vate Technologies, Inc
Jupiter, FL  33477
561-743-8696